Content authored by Luigi LUCCARELLI


102 articles found:

Letter from the Editor: language industry

The Language Industry: it’s a term we can’t escape but exactly what does it mean? I’ve started to wonder to what extent practitioners are really a part of it. And if we are, what role do we have – lead, supporting cast or bit players?

  • updated

Language in the news

Books in translation and videos about translation, podcasts on language and articles about interpreting, plus AIIC voices in the social media await just a click away.

  • updated

When I read that the Westminster MA Conference Interpreting course had been shut down, I was struck dumb. Should I offer my condolences to all who had worked hard to make it a premier choice among post-grad interpreter training programs? Or should I feel vicariously relieved that a group of hard-working colleagues would no longer have to deal with bureaucrats incapable of grasping the import of what they were doing?

  • updated

Language in the news

We begin with research on the origins of language and end with how improvisation is mirrored in the brain. In between we explore campaigns in defense of professional rights, endangered languages, linguistic roadblocks, and blogs from interpreters.

  • updated

Language in the news

Our searchlight shines on the controversy surrounding certification, books, webcasts, blogs and apps, and much more in the wide world of words.

  • updated

Letter from the Editor: freelance interpreting

You’re nearing the end of the morning session and you feel good, even optimistic. Lunch is welcome and you follow it with a coffee, not that you feel in need of a pick-me-up, but it certainly won’t hurt. Then back to the booth, where an hour later it hits you with a sucker-punch: your eyes sag, a fog envelops your mind. That old nemesis - jet lag - is back with a vengeance.

  • updated

Language in the news

A spate of web watching and our band of LIN irregulars have uncovered stories on EULITA, a Nuremberg interpreter speaking out, a campaign against the blight of office-speak, language workers demanding recognition, and literary translation.

  • updated

Letter from the Editor: freelance interpreting

Freelancers often don’t think of getting sick until they do. When one is taking those first tentative steps in the profession, health matters seem at worst a short-term inconvenience – get a cold, get over it, get back to work. But if you’re planning to make a career of freelancing, a long-term view is needed.

  • updated

Language in the news

In this issue we highlight another interpreter casualty in Afghanistan, insight into how language may affect thought, a radio program on language and culture, and a growing need for foreign language education.

  • updated

Letter from the Editor: freelance interpreting

Do you know how much you work? Not just the number of days you bill, but how much of your time is actually dedicated to all things related to work? Let’s look into it.

  • updated

Language in the news

We’re back with videos and radio programs by and about interpreters, books translated and sometimes not distributed, and opinions about how new communication technologies are reshaping our gray matter.

  • updated

Language in the news

Let's take a look at markets - their size, potential, components and rankings - and speculate about the role of freelance interpreters. Along the way we visit some ideas on how language shapes the way we think, a new gadget, and paying attention to enhance quality of life.

  • updated

Letter from the Editor: freelance interpreting

Murky concepts of business overpower clear thinking in this business-dominated world. No, I'm not about to rant about blind faith in the rationality of markets; rather let's try to apply a smidgeon of rationality to the business of making a living as a freelance interpreter.

  • updated

Language in the news

Is the good work of interpreters ever recognised? What do Anfillo, Bung and Hoti have in common? Will learning a language contribute to healthy senior years? What is left after you've read the OED? So much to learn and so little time!

  • updated

The AIIC Malintzin prize 2009

Mr. Hans-Dietrich Genscher, former Foreign Minister of Germany, assiduously promoted the use of languages in international discourse. In the opening ceremony of the 2009 AIIC Assembly in Nice (France), he became the first recipient of the AIIC Malintzin Prize in recognition of his advocacy of the right to speak the tongue we all speak best - our own.

  • updated

Language in the news

Videos, various ways to visualize language, a Brussels recruitment campaign and follow-up to past postings are just a click away.

  • updated

Letter from the Editor

Are you fed up with finding the hackneyed headline "Lost in Translation" atop every media report vaguely related to language? I am. How far has this plague spread? I googled the catchphrase and came up with 3.8 million references. Food for thought.

  • updated

Language in the news

Radio, press, films and books are on display in this tour of the Internet. Borges and translation, an interview with a former interpreter in Iraq, and a recent documentary on two scientists traveling in search of disappearing languages are just some of the offerings.

  • updated

Letter from the Editor

Nobody likes to wait and nobody really enjoys a waiting room. I'm sitting in one next to a man pointedly punching the keys of a sleek handheld wireless device. I'm curious and tempted; my cell phone only handles calls and text messages on its tiny black and white screen. It's starting to look like a hand-me-down.

  • updated

Language in the news

We offer you pages on language diversity and cooperation in South America and northern Europe, official multilingualism in a growing EU, a video from Afghanistan, and controversy surrounding a trial in the USA, plus an introduction to interpreter websites not about interpreting.

  • updated

Language in the news

Worldwide ramblings on translation/interpretation as a profession, the conundrum of interpreting in situations/zones of conflict, craft in a commercialized world, and censorship run rampant. Read now before sites are blocked!

  • updated

Language in the news

AIIC has chosen professional secrecy as a subject for special discussion at its next assembly. There may be a lot of time before we meet in Nice in January 2009, but to lubricate our mental gears for the run-in, let's take a look at websites with something to say about ethics and interpreting in general.

  • updated

Letter from the Editor

Let's get one thing clear: I have no problem recognising that people - and interpreters are clearly people - work to make money. In fact, I think it is so evident that it doesn't need repeating. I prefer to take the proposition a step further: interpreters are often underpaid.

  • updated

Language in the news

Translators and interpreters as literary creations, language and identity, how to read a translation, what email and interpreting have in common, freelance writers on strike, and Chinese slogans for a score of situations.

  • updated

Letter from the Editor

I'm at work: a spacious booth at the UN Conference Center in Bangkok. The door behind me opens onto an internal hallway, another entrance separating our area from the public space outside. Before me a desk-to-ceiling window allows for a good view of the room while providing acoustic isolation.

  • updated

Language in the news

An Internet search for interpreter + conflict renders more results than one might expect, and in turn makes one wonder why such bounty should be unexpected these days. Here is a selection of what I found.

  • updated

Language in the news

Radio and video, interviews with interpreters, translation in the media, and a featured author are all just a click away.

  • updated

AIIC discovers thailand

The purpose of an inter-regional meeting is discovery. AIIC funds are used to help members travel great distances in order to meet with colleagues they might not otherwise get to know. Examination of the usual list of pressing issues acquires greater depth of field with new participants from multiple cultures. You look around the room and you realize there is no majority, only various minorities contributing on an equal basis. It's a perfectly comfortable setting for an interpreter.

  • updated

Letter from the Editor – standardisation and quality

AIIC developed professional standards knowing that working conditions affect quality - and thus communication. In the 1970's, the association collaborated with the EU and ISO in elaborating technical standards for built-in booths and sound equipment (ISO 2603), and later extended that cooperation to mobile installations (ISO 4043). Further efforts to understand and promote quality have continued with AIIC-sponsored projects such as the Work Load Study. This collective concern with quality is also felt individually by members, perhaps in ways that might surprise some.

  • updated

Language in the news

The speaker’s role in multilingual communication, news from the EU, recent research, and interpreters as fictional characters are on the roll call.

  • updated

Letter from the Editor

These days all enquiries regarding work reach me by email. This might not be the case if I lived in a European or North American meeting metropolis, but living in Asia, my phone is quieter and the answering machine long retired. It's positive that individual interpreters can make themselves more visible on the Internet (e.g. through the AIIC directory), but what to do when the result is a feeler from an unknown source?

  • updated

Language in the news

Around and around it goes - taking you to language resources that too few know.

  • updated

Letter from the Editor

I have always thought that if I can see something in my mind's eye, I'll be able to describe it. Or in another sense, if I can see what a speaker is saying, I'll be able to interpret it. My orientation is acutely visual, although I will say that certain places have imprinted an olfactory rather than a visual image. But I haven't yet found a use for smell in my interpreting practice while I have for visualization.

  • updated

Letter from the Editor

I’ve seen it year after year. A pall of wintry worry and agitation settles over the interpreting community almost before anyone has realized that the holidays are no longer so recent nor the break from work so restful. Projects are in danger of going missing in inaction. Anxiety sets out its mirrors reflecting only itself ad infinitum: When will offers of work start arriving? Is the phone broken? Has AIIC mail lost my messages? Should I be more pro-active or less pushy? I call it February Syndrome. Fortunately, February is the shortest month of the year!

  • updated

A talk with new members

From 1999 to 2000 – just one short year - the number of new members admitted to AIIC doubled (from roughly 75 to about 150), and since then the annual figure has remained substantially above 100. That means that some 700 colleagues have swelled the ranks of the association since the turn of the century. Communicate!, in collaboration with VEGA, decided to interview some of our newest  members during assembly week. Here’s what we heard.

  • updated

Numer-AIIC-ology

Facts, figures and photos from Brussels and beyond

  • updated

The booth bookshelf

Ever wonder what conference interpreters read in their leisure time? Here's a sample across four continents.

  • updated

Letter from the Editor: AIIC turns 50

Many would say that one’s 50s is hardly the prime of life, but those who have passed the half-century mark would hardly agree. AIIC started to celebrate its birthday a bit early – it won’t officially turn fifty until November – with the recent assembly in Porto - and except for a few squeaky joints, showed that maturity has its advantages.

  • updated

Any portal in a storm

Interpreting the Internet is a monthly service aimed at helping AIIC members get the most out of the Internet. This month, we're offering some thoughts on your choice of a starting point for surfing the Web

  • updated