Content owned by Interpreters in areas of conflict

25 articles found:

Open Letter to the French President

With the withdrawal of French troops from Afghanistan, the government allowed a small number of Afghan interpreters and their families to enter France, but many were left behind and no plans were made to consider further visa applications. This letter to the French President urges France to re-open its doors to those linguists requesting shelter as the security situation deteriorates.

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Open letter to Chancellor Angela Merkel

As troop withdrawals continue, the German government, like many others, has been slow to process visa requests by targeted Afghan interpreters who helped their armed forces. The German parliament recently rejected a motion to protect all Afghan nationals who worked for the German army by enabling their resettlement in Germany. The four signatory organisations, together with the Germany's Federal Association of Interpreters and Translators (BDÜ) , send an open letter to Chancellor Merkel, urging her to save the lives of our linguist colleagues, the most vulnerable at the moment in Afghanistan.

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Open Letter to UK Prime Minister Cameron

As the targeted killings by the Taliban increase, branded as traitors the interpreters left behind by British troops fear for their lives. The British government recently revealed details of a severely flawed plan to help only some of them. AIIC, FIT, IAPTI, and Red T write an open letter to David Cameron, echoing David Davis' call to give them all a safe haven in the UK.

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Joint letter to the Danish authorities brings change of heart in Copenhagen

Following letters to the US administration and the Swedish government, this joint letter to the Danish Prime Minister produced an immediate effect. Hardly had the letter been published than the Danish government announced a change in its policy towards Afghan interpreters who had helped their troops, opening a door to their applications for visas. We are extremely pleased that the joint pressure from AIIC, FIT, IAPTI and RED T, written at a decisive time for the debate in Denmark, seems to have been the trigger for the government's change of heart.

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Open Letter to the Swedish Prime Minister

Afghan interpreters who helped Swedish forces in Afghanistan have so far been unable to claim asylum in Sweden although fearing for their lives as troops pull out. As the Swedish parliament opens its session and debates the question of whether and how to assist them, AIIC, FIT, IAPTI and RedT publish another open letter, this time addressed to the Swedish Prime Minister and other cabinet ministers urging them to take action.

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Languages at war 2010

The second Languages at War workshop met at the Imperial War Museum, London, under the title 'Meeting the “other” in war'. Combat narrative and the language of historians, language as part of the political economy of war, language teaching for war scenarios, interrogation and the “unsayable” things of war were all on the agenda.

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Conflict zones: the first hurdle

Interpreters in conflict zones received the support of forty members of the Council of Europe Parliamentary Assembly in a Declaration signed on 29 April 2010 in Strasbourg. The signatories are from all the political groups; the Declaration may be signed by other members between now and the next session in June.

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AIIC forum on interpreters in conflict areas

A recent panel discussion in Rome drew attention to the plight of interpreters in conflict areas and called for fairer treatment by employers, often governments and their armed forces. Promotion of codes of practice and opportunities for training were cited as urgent needs, as was special status to safeguard physical integrity.

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Languages at war

I've never been through psychoanalysis and after recently attending a workshop in the interests of our new project on interpreters in conflict areas, I'm not sure I ever want to. All day I felt like a laboratory mouse.

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Interpreters in conflict zones: the limits of neutrality

Our association has more than once wondered if the time had come to reconsider our profession and its - our - place in the world. The need to do so has never struck me with such force as when beginners or outsiders ask apparently taxing questions about our responsibility and the moral conflicts it could lead to. They might be about translating a profanity or replacing a solecism with something better or perhaps more politically correct if we are to play the sublime role we claim as facilitators of dialogue or even messengers of peace.

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