Content tagged 'freelance'

Careers

Most interpreters are freelance. Some are employees of international institutions or large companies. Every interpreting career is different.

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Freelance interpreters

Freelance conference interpreters are employed on a short-term basis. They work for various clients in succession, depending on demand and their capabilities.

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Employment opportunities

Conference interpreters work for businesses, government and international organisations to convert information from one spoken language to another. Most interpreters are self-employed and have variable schedules.

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Letter from the Editor: freelance interpreting

Freelancers often don’t think of getting sick until they do. When one is taking those first tentative steps in the profession, health matters seem at worst a short-term inconvenience – get a cold, get over it, get back to work. But if you’re planning to make a career of freelancing, a long-term view is needed.

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Letter from the Editor: freelance interpreting

An interpreter is an interpreter is an interpreter. The proliferation of titles and categories is often nothing more than a marketing ploy - create a niche and occupy it. Employers play the game too, searching for ways to corner markets and cut expenses. What's a freelancer to do?

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Letter from the Editor: freelance interpreting

Murky concepts of business overpower clear thinking in this business-dominated world. No, I'm not about to rant about blind faith in the rationality of markets; rather let's try to apply a smidgeon of rationality to the business of making a living as a freelance interpreter.

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Budgeting time and costs for professional conference interpreters: who wants to be a millionaire?

It was at the beginning of 2004 when I started to wonder whether there is a good balance between our input into a job and the income that we generate from this input. Other authors before me have tried to compare, for example, experienced conference interpreters and civil servants, or in the translation field, have put forward approaches to calculating prices per line and word.

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Working for OECD

The official languages of the organisation are French and English. Interpreters must be able to work both ways on bilingual meetings. In addition, other languages may be used as required.

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